A The sims 3 Story

Chapter seven – Decisions

So.
Well.
I did say my game died on the forums, and it did, but seeing how I was already halfway into the chapter anyway, I figured I might at well post it. It’ll be a very short chapter though. Please forgive me! >.<

__________________________________________________

It was a bright Monday afternoon. Mr. Tolson hadn’t given me any lectures because of my sleepiness for a change, and so I was in a very good mood when I took the bus home. I rarely got the chance to ride it at all, really, seeing how I was always either late or in detention when it left.


Inside, I was still debating whether to tell Ethan about what had happened lately or not. I wanted to, really, but at the same time I tried my hardest not to think about it myself. Ethan would believe me, of that I was sure. We’d been best friends for long enough to believe everything the other said.
But telling him meant we’d have a conversation about it, and It, and then I’d have to experience it all over again through words. I did not want that to happen.

So during the ride home we talked about boring, everyday things, me trying to keep the subject from anything supernatural and him obviously trying to avoid coming back on him trying to ask me on a date. Soon, we reached my house.
‘See you tomorrow, Ethan.’
‘See ya.’

‘Dad! I’m back!’
There was no response. Maybe he was still at work? I pushed the front door open and entered my house. It was dark inside for a bright spring day. Turning on the lights, I quickly made my way up to the kitchen.

‘Hey, mum. I’m home.’
If she’d still be alive, would she come and give me a hug when I came home after school? She seemed the type of person to do that. I’m sure she would.

‘Hey, dad? Where are you?’
The door was unlocked, so he had to be home. Then why didn’t he come to greet me? Why was it so cold inside? Was something wrong?

I heard noises from the room opposite of the kitchen. A bad feeling came over me as I slowly pushed dad’s bedroom door open.

There he was, sitting in the dark all by himself. His shoulders shook up and down abruptly every few seconds and his hands, he clutched underneath his chin, seemed to tremble.

‘…Dad? Is something wrong? Are you sick?’

‘Micah…’
He slowly got up and turned around. The look on his face turned my blood to ice.
‘It’s your grandparents…’

‘They’ve… passed away last night.’

‘What…?’ I muttered, my breathing ragged. I felt dizzy. ‘B-but… I’ve seen them… just yesterday! I… I saw… grams…’
‘I’m sorry, Micah. They’re… not here anymore.’

Great plumbob. They’d… died… both of them. I’d seen her spirit. Could I have known what was going to happen? Could I have stopped it? Was this…
Was this my fault?

__________________________________________________

The burial ceremony was held two days afterwards.

I’d locked myself in my bedroom the whole time. Dad, thinking it was my way to deal with grieving, had let me be and only came up to bring me breakfast and dinner.
We’d dressed up properly fur the funeral, as was appropriate in Sunset Valley. I walked next to dad, barely seeing where we were going. The gravestones and trees passed by me in a blur.
This wasn’t real. This couldn’t be real. It was just my imagination. Everything felt strange, as if I was sleepwalking through the graveyard.

Then their gravestones came in sight and I was kicked back into reality.
This was no dream. It was real.
They were dead.

My chest began to burn and I felt hot, wet tears run down my cheek. I quickly put my hands in front of my face, but couldn’t stop myself from crying. My heart broke into pieces remembering the years I’d spent at their side.
They’d been like parents to me, too. The closest thing I’d ever had to a mother figure was dead.
I was all alone.

Dad crying next to me immediately made me reject that thought. I wasn’t alone. I still had him. Dad meant the world to me and I knew it was like that the other way around, too.
Then why did I still have that big, empty hole inside of me?

‘I-if only I’d s-stayed a bit… a bit longer,’ I sobbed, ‘I could h-have done something…’
‘Don’t say that,’ dad said. ‘It’s not your fault, Micah. It’s no one’s fault. It was their time to go.’

I shook my head and tried to wipe the tears from my face, but new ones came right away. He didn’t understand. I wanted to tell him. Tell him what I saw. New sobs came out as soon as I opened my mouth and prevented me from saying anything. I couldn’t. Not now.

As the ceremony ended, people began to leave. I stayed right where I was and stared at the gravestones, barely able to see anything through the tears.
Eventually, I felt dad’s hand on my arm.
‘Let’s go back to the car, Micah. We should leave here.’
I pulled back violently and shook my head again. I couldn’t leave. I needed to stay. Stay… and explain.


‘All right… I’ll wait for you at the exit,’ he said softly.  ‘Take all the time you need, okay? We’ll leave when you’ve calmed down, sweetheart. Don’t worry. It will be alright.’


I heard him turn around and slowly walk away. Soon, his footsteps disappeared into the distance and were replaced by silence.
He was wrong. It wasn’t going to be alright.
Because this was all my fault.

I sat down on the cold, hard ground next to my grandmother’s gravestone and buried my face into my arms. All of the other guests, my uncle and his wife and children, had disappeared together with dad minutes ago. I was all by myself. The silence was maddening, allowing my thoughts to run free.

My grandparents wouldn’t have died if I’d told them about what I saw. Or anyone else for that matter. We could have taken them to the hospital, and there the doctors would have given them medication or treatment to make them healthy again. But I kept my mouth shut, and because of that they died.

This was the second time that I could have saved someone from dying. But I was too much of a coward to do anything.
I was a horrible person.


I sat myself on the bench and curled up into a ball, tears still streaming down my face. Grandma’s face haunted my mind and was replaced by grandpa’s, and Gerry’s, and mum’s. They’d all died. They’d died and there was nothing I could do to change further deaths.

But wait… There was.

The thought came to me in a flash. It was so easy. So incredibly simple I couldn’t believe I hadn’t thought about it in the last two days.
There was something I could do. Something I should have done a long time ago.

It was time to learn how to control this.

______________________________________________


‘Dad.’
He turned around swiftly, with a startled look on his face, as if he hadn’t heard me coming. It soon turned into a smile, though.
‘There you are, Micah. Have you calmed down a little?’
‘Yes. I’ve had plenty of time to think.’
‘Good. Let’s go home for dinner and-‘

‘Dad. I’ve made a decision.’
The smile faded.
‘What do you mean?’
This was the right thing to do. I’d thought it through, and it was the best way to learn. It was the only way to learn.

‘Dad… I’m going to Landgraab.’

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5 responses

  1. Nice chapter, Micah I have a bad feeling about you going there……

    September 26, 2012 at 15:13

  2. PhoenixQueen

    Micah don’t say that!! You couldn’t have stopped it!!! It wasn’t your fault!! And while I admire her wanting to control her power, going to Landgraab doesn’t seem like a good idea…

    September 26, 2012 at 22:53

    • It really doesn’t, does it? >.< But she's not going to change her mind at this point.

      October 3, 2012 at 22:25

  3. Poor girl, blaming herself 😦 I suppose it’s normal to blame yourself when a loved one dies, but darling, consider their age. It was simply time, and they were ready.

    I have mixed feelings about the science facility. Her learning how to control it will be great, but it’s just never as easy as that.

    October 8, 2012 at 00:03

  4. FInally going to work on catching up. Your writing is as emotional as always. 🙂

    November 18, 2012 at 02:16

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